Five Responses to Reading Genesis 1–2 (ed. J. Daryl Charles) #3

Charles, J. Daryl, ed. Reading Genesis 1–2 : An Evangelical Conversation (Peabody: Hendrickson, 2013).
Charles, ed., Reading Genesis 1-2

My last post in this series offered my opinions on Chapter Two: Reading Genesis 1–2: A Literal Approach, by Todd S. Beall.

Now I offer a few thoughts on the next chapter:

Chapter Three: Reading Genesis 1–2 with the Grain: Analogical Days, by C. John Collins (+ the four responses of the other writers)

At the time of publication, Collins was/is “Professor of Old Testament in the Dept. of Scripture and Interpretation at Covenant Theological Seminary, St. Louis, Missouri. He has a long list of achievements and publications in the interpretation of Genesis and understanding of creation, and brings scientific as well as theological training to the task. I was quite impressed years ago with his article, “How Old Is the Earth? Anthropomorphic Days in Genesis 1:1-2:3,” Presbyterion 20 (1994), 109-130, and he has more recently published:

C. John Collins, Genesis 1-4: A Linguistic, Literary, and Theological Commentary (Phillipsberg, NJ: P&R Publishing, 2006).

Collins, C. John. “Adam and Eve as Historical People, and Why It Matter,” Perspectives on Science and Christian Faith 62, no. 3 (2009), 147–165.

Collins, C. John. Did Adam and Eve Really Exist?: Who They Were and Why You Should Care (Wheaton, IL: Crossway, 2011).

Collins’ position has remained consistent over the two decades or so since the first-mentioned article was published, and is reflected in the present chapter. The 2nd and 3rd titles actually reflect where the heat is in Genesis debates at the moment – not the age of the earth, the Genesis 1 days or evolution per se, but whether we should insist that Adam and Eve were literal people. Earlier in the present volume Collins cites N.T. Wright in a kind of cautious support for a historical Adam and Even (see p. 64 and footnotes), but that is not really discussed in the chapter under review.

So what is?

Continue reading

Advertisements

A Recent Commentary on Job Reviewed

This is my review of the recent Job commentary by Melbourne local Lindsay Wilson (Ridley College) in the Two Horizons Old Testament Commentary series. It is ready for an upcoming issue of Australian Biblical Review. In enjoyed reading (most of) Lindsay’s commentary (we are acquainted through Bible college circles here in Melbourne) on what is one of the great and profound books on the Old Testament, and felt that he had a skillful and theologically robust grasp of the book. Very common-sense as well! I encourage you to pick it up. By the way, it’s great value for money.

https://www.academia.edu/15593591/Book_Review_LINDSAY_WILSON._Job._The_Two_Horizons_Old_Testament_Commentary_Grand_Rapids_Eerdmans_2015_

Wilson - Job - Two Horizons

By the way, I have almost finished reading Job in Hebrew after months of nearly daily efforts, and I’m happy to say it’s some of the most difficult biblical Hebrew I have ever dealt with. It does share a lot of vocabulary with Psalms, though, if you want to read two books that will reinforce each other well.